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Logan Enhancement Project fauna connectivity plan a landmark win for critical wildlife corridor

Posted on March 3rd, 2017

Transurban Queensland’s plan for improving fauna connectivity as part of the $512 million Logan Enhancement Project has been labelled one of the most significant outcomes for road ecology in Australia.

The project Environmental Reference Group (ERG), which includes representatives from six local environmental groups, has praised Transurban Queensland’s solution to maintaining and enhancing fauna connectivity around the road network as a win of international significance.

The project, which was approved by the State Government in late 2016, is located within the Queensland Government’s designated ecological and conservation corridor linking the Karawatha Forest to the Flinders Range.

Recognising the importance of this green belt and the environmental significance of the surrounding bushland and wetlands, Transurban Queensland worked closely with the ERG to ensure fauna connectivity and the protection of the Karawatha Forest and other nature resources in the area were included in the final design.

The design includes a number of significant fauna movement improvements across the Logan and Gateway Extension motorways, including the addition of new crossings, fencing, and refuge poles.

Beaudesert Road fauna overpass design concept

Beaudesert Road fauna overpass design concept

Griffith University Professor Darryl Jones, from the ERG, said the fauna solution plan was a landmark example of effective collaboration and would dramatically improve the safe movement of various species through the ecologically important corridor.

“The Logan Enhancement project is an excellent example of what can be achieved when all participants work closely to develop the best ideas to increase fauna connectivity of what will be a major new motorway development,” Professor Jones said.

“Already, the excellent relations between the parties has seen remarkable innovations and new approaches to road fauna connectivity that indicate that this project will be of both national and international interest.”

B4C Catchment Manager Wayne Cameron said the project design could be the most significant win for road ecology in Australia to date.

“We thank Transurban Queensland for the opportunity to work towards something worthwhile for our community and wildlife,” Mr Cameron said

“The project addressed every area the group identified and delivers a comprehensive mix of solutions across all the major areas, which will mitigate some of the impacts of major road construction and infrastructure through a valuable wildlife corridor.”

Project Director Andrew Baker, who was recently recognised by the Bulimba Creek Catchment Coordinating Committee (B4C) for his contribution to fauna movement solutions across the network, said the environmental elements of the design were shaped by feedback received from the ERG.

“We will continue to work with the ERG throughout detailed design and construction on a number of key project elements, including vegetation removal offsets.”